An update

Since I came back from our trip in Holland and the UK, I was busy on a massive project, which for the time being needs to remain a secret until it will present itself in the public domain.

So, now that this project is behind me, I thought it was time to share some of my latest drawings.

First, here is something I suspect I have never done before:

A portrait of Shmuel Dankner for the cover of G.

magazine

This gentleman, is alleged to be implicated in a real estate scam at the highest echelon of the israeli business arena.

As it was an emergency, I was pushed by the amiable and talented art director of the magazine, Sharon Rodnic to confront the task, as always, with very little time … I suppose that if I was allowed more time I would probably wouldn’t have taken it on as I consider myself as a rather modest portraitist.

cover G Shmuel Dankner, cover G

cover G Shmuel Dankner, cover G

Why are there no gay CEOs?

This was the question at the center of the article I was invited to illustrate for Calcalist lest week, so here is my interpretation of that theme.

Why are there no gay CEOs?

Why are there no gay CEOs?

And now, here are some Harfords:

Why recessions aren’t all about job losses

Why recessions aren’t all about job losses

Why recessions aren’t all about job losses

“Imagine a recession on Planet Vulcan. Thanks to weak demand, an able and hard-working Vulcan subordinate is simply not doing enough business to justify his salary.”

You can read the rest of Tim’s article here

Should I bet against my party winning?

Should I bet against my party winning?

Should I bet against my party winning?

Dear Economist,
As canvassing for the general election gathers speed, I’ve been thinking about the gambling possibilities. Without going into specifics, I’m considering placing bets on the rival team’s victory – as insurance in the event of having to live in a world not entirely to my liking.

Would this be psychologically effective, or am I wasting my money? What price should I place on my political ideals?
Justin, south-east London

You can read Tim’s reply here

Fried chicken versus fresh air

Fried chicken versus fresh air

Fried chicken versus fresh air

Family Harford is now safely installed in one of the grimmest parts of Hackney. Just outside the back door is a “massage parlour”, a kebab shop, a jerk chicken joint and a betting shop, not to mention flowers for the young man who was recently shot dead outside a local nightclub. At the front is a row of abandoned cars, courtesy of the garage just across the road and the other one just round the corner. Delis are there none.

You can read the rest of Tim’s article here

Hard cash underpins the spirit of independence

Hard cash underpins the spirit of independence

Hard cash underpins the spirit of independence

Energy. Ambition. Confidence. Patience. Fearlessness. All these traits are associated with that mysterious quality of “entrepreneurialism”. Self-made men, such as Richard Branson and Alan Sugar, seem to exude different qualities from ordinary wage slaves.

You can read the rest of Tim’s article here

Wanted: less exploitative ways to do more with less

Wanted: less exploitative ways to do more with less

Wanted: less exploitative ways to do more with less

On a visit to India last year, I bought some shampoo from a roadside kiosk in Kolkata. This was largely unremarkable, although like any shopping trip further afield than Dublin, it brought a frisson of excitement.

You can read the rest of Tim’s article here

A marginal victory for the well-meaning environmentalist

A marginal victory for the well-meaning environmentalist

A marginal victory for the well-meaning environmentalist

At the risk of turning this column into “The Undercover Environmentalist”, I need to return to that vexed question of carbon dioxide emissions. In my first column of the year, I vowed to reduce my carbon footprint from air travel – easy enough, given that it was 50 tonnes of CO2 last year. A kind reader wrote to reassure me that I needn’t lose any sleep, because the planes were making the journey anyway. Glib, I know: I’ve often said it myself to wind up environmentalists.

You can read the rest of Tim’s article here

At last the con has been taken out of econometrics

At last the con has been taken out of econometrics

At last the con has been taken out of econometrics

In 1983, Edward Leamer published an article with contents that would become almost as celebrated as its title. “Let’s Take the Con Out of Econometrics” began with an analogy that remains useful. Imagine an agricultural researcher who tests the effectiveness of a new fertiliser by dividing land into strips and spreading the new fertiliser only on a randomly chosen selection of those strips. Because of the randomisation, any effect will presumably be thanks to the fertiliser.

You can read the rest of Tim’s article here

Should I become a vegetarian?

Should I become a vegetarian?

Should I become a vegetarian?

Dear Economist,
A growing trend among my fellow students is converting to vegetarianism for environmental reasons, citing statistics that meat production, in particular beef, is a tremendous cause of greenhouse gas emissions. I was wondering if you could provide some insight into the actual environmental cost of a steak. How does it compare to driving, or flying? Would a simple tax on beef production be much more efficient than vegetarianism?
Max

You can read Tim’s reply here

The straw that broke the camel’s back

I often raise doubts regarding my ability to convey a particular message through my illustration.

On this occasion, be it for technical printing difficulties or faults in my crafting of the image itself, I seem to have failed in my attempt to communicate an idea.

Lapid wrote last week in his column, a poignant piece centered on the socioeconomic imbalance between religious and secular in Israel. Yair raised the alarm, while using a metaphors of a car, driven by the seculars, which would no longer be able to carry its ever-increasing in number load of religious passengers.

As I was making an effort to complement this metaphor with another, I have chosen to try and depict the concept of: The straw that broke the camel’s back.

I worked on a simulation of an X-ray of a camel, who’s back is falling a part while a single straw is falling on top of a heap of straw packed on its back.

… and here I seem to have failed.

Questions were raised by some of my most dedicated and avid followers, regarding the nature of that beast, and how, if at all is it related to the article.

So, with my sincere apologies, here is the illustration as I sent it to the paper, with the hope it might clarify the matter.

The straw that broke the camel's back

The straw that broke the camel's back

The straw

The straw

10 years a go….

a swimmer (we cannot see his tail)

a swimmer (we cannot see his tail)

…I was invited by the city of Breda in Holland, to create a 14 meter long by  1.5  meters high tiled wall for their new Sonsbeeck municipal swimming pool.

This was, and still remain one of the most exciting projects I was involved in.

Through this project I had the chance to meet some incredible  people of rare qualities.

In particular,  the artists at Tichelaar, Holland’s oldest ceramic company.

They’ve departed from scaled down drawing  which I provided them with, and through a very laborious process, they turned it into a magnificently colourful tiled wall.

Since our daughter, Alma, was born, we promised ourselves to go there with her and see it again.

Ten years after the opening we found the wall  in its same immaculate condition as it was on its first day. We left Breda with a big smile on our faces.

Tha wall at  Sonsbeeck

Tha wall at Sonsbeeck

detail 1

detail 1

detail 2

detail 2

detail 3

detail 3

My proud daughter

Alma