The perpetual burden of filing

The nightmare of introducing documents into our sacred household, is an act which I consider to be aggressive and violent on our precious dwindling time resources.

I was asked to illustrate an article dealing with filing management, relating in particular to the French health care bureaucracy.

 

The perpetual burden of filing

The perpetual burden of filing

And here is the rough:

The perpetual burden of filing-Rough

The perpetual burden of filing-Rough

 

Will Mutual Assured Destruction Continue to Deter Nuclear War?

This month’s Skeptic is raising and dealing with an existential question nested in the human nature.

Here it is:

When I was in elementary school in the early 1960s, we were periodically put through “duck and cover” drills under the risibly ridiculous fantasy that our flimsy wooden desks would protect us from a thermonuclear detonation over Los Angeles. When I was an undergraduate at Pepperdine University in 1974, the father of the hydrogen bomb, Edward Teller, spoke at our campus about the effectiveness of mutual assured destruction (MAD) to deter war. He said that by stockpiling many weapons neither side has anything to gain by initiating a first strike because of the retaliatory capability of both to send the other back to the Paleolithic.

Read the clicking on the image below:

 

scientific american Mutual Assured Destruction

Scientific American Mutual Assured Destruction

 

Here is my rough for this illustration:

Mutual Assured Destruction- rough

Mutual Assured destruction rough

And the final artwork:

Mutual Assured Destruction (MAD) artwork

Mutual Assured Destruction (MAD) artwork

 

A Silver divorce

My last piece for Investment news was around the topic of  what’s called a Silver divorce, a separation between two mature partners which should involve in their separation agreement all their earthly assets including their pension funds.

I am sharing here the roughs that eventually brought about the final artwork, as I personally preferred the first idea, The editor was in fact looking for something that would spell out in a more pronounce way the actual players in this sorry event, so here they are.

Retirement Income

Retirement Income

Silver divorce, rough 1

Silver divorce, rough 1

Silver divorce , rough 2

Silver divorce , rough 2

Silver divorce AW

Silver divorce AW

 

Naughty or Nice? When Does It Begin?

This is the title for Michael Shermer’s May Skeptic column for Scientific American.

A the title suggests, the text explores the tipping point between a moralistic elevation or a stumble into the pits of evil.

Shermer  brings the example an incident captured on a cctv camera in a subway station, showing a woman being pushed from the platform onto the rails by another man. The next thing that happens, is the arrival of a man who witnessed the incident from the other end of the platform, reaching straight to the assailant, hitting and punching him for his aggression. Only then, he attends to the lady who’s been lying on the rails, vulnerable to a potentially lethal arrival of a train.

This course of events, raises many questions about our instinctive view of right and wrong and our inherent sense of justice. The surprising results of an experiment with babies, shed some light on a possible explanation for this behavior.

unfortunately, a YouTube video which relates to the text, and eventually to my illustration, had been removed and can no longer be watched. However, the text in the article describes the sequence of events in a clear manner.

Worth reading.

Naughty or Nice? When Does It Begin?

Naughty or Nice? When Does It Begin?

 

Disappearing professions

Well, it been a while, it’s been a while since the article with the illustrations here below was published and I was just being lazy not posting it here.

In my previous post I had put up two roughs in preparation for these final artworks. The illustrations were published in Calcalist for a special about the changing landscape of the culture of work.

This in fact was the brief, therefore it allowed me great margins of metaphoric freedom.

I don’t feel like I have gone too far with the ideas, still I hope I have managed to be communicative yet sufficiently inventive.

Rowing

Rowing

Rowing details

Rowing detail 1

Rowing detail 2

Rowing detail 2

The frog experience

The frog experience

The frog experience details

The frog experience details

A matter of time

A matter of time

Falling from grace

Falling from grace

Falling from grace detail

Falling from grace detail

 

 

 

What Science Tells Us about Why We Lie

This month’s Scientific American’s Skeptic dealt with the question of: When are we most (and least) likely to lie?

For that purpose Michael Shermer cited Geico insurance’s ad, showing Mary Lincoln asking her husband, “Does this dress make my backside look big?” Honest Abe squirms and shifts, then hesitates and, while holding his thumb and forefinger an inch apart, finally mutters, “Perhaps a bit,” causing his wife to spin on her heels and exit in a huff.

The rest of the article, is a fascinating in-depth look into the mechanism of lying, a great read.

A link to the full article, here.

Abraham Lincoln unlucky day - line

Abraham Lincoln unlucky day – line

Abraham Lincoln unlucky day - AW

Abraham Lincoln unlucky day – AW